Third Coast Conversations

June 12, 19 and 26 at 8pm

Over the past eight months, WCMU has been working with Michigan Humanities, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, to explore an issue of great importance to Michigan: water. We held group conversations in three communities about various water related issues, and met with everyone from educators to anglers to conservation experts, to talk about one of Michigan's most important resources.

During the month of June, WCMU will air three hour-long specials we're calling "Third Coast Conversations." We'll bring you parts of the conversations we held in Alpena at the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, in Petoskey at the Petoskey District Library, and in Mount Pleasant at the Ziibiwing Center on the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Reservation. We'll also visit classrooms, rivers and lakes, and explore the impact water has on our lives.

This series of conversations, and our broadcast specials, are made possible in part by a grant from Michigan Humanities, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or Michigan Humanities. 

Ways to Connect

Michigan’s water has seen some serious challenges, from industry, agriculture, and maybe even your backyard. Experts say private septic systems are a significant source of surface water contamination.

We used a community conversation in Mount Pleasant to explore threats to Michigan’s water and ideas to help it recover,  everything from using science to songs. Below, you can listen to parts of that conversation, as well as hear from people in the community who are on the front lines of efforts to protect Michigan's waters.

Michigan’s water has seen some serious challenges, from industry, agriculture, and maybe even your backyard. Experts say private septic systems are a significant source of surface water contamination.

We used a community conversation in Mount Pleasant to explore threats to Michigan’s water and ideas to help it recover,  everything from using science to songs. 

A lot of people dream of buying a house on the water, and the Great Lakes state offers more opportunities than most others.  Michigan’s lakes and streams not only created the state, but they also create a strong sense of place for people who visit and live here.

But the peace that the water gives can also be taken away.  Waterside communities often face a serious housing shortages. Second homes and vacation rentals are claiming space, meaning even well paid workers can’t find a place to live.  

Shawn Hoskey

WCMU Public Media conducted this community conversation on the Great Lakes on March 19, 2019, to hear thoughts from residents in northern Michigan  about our waterways. The event was recorded live at the Petoskey District Library, and  served as the basis for a WCMU Public Radio special, which you can listen to here.

Michigan's lakes and streams are in high demand, and users expect them to be refreshing and pristine. But what does the law say about who has access to water, and who is responsible for it?

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