Hansi Lo Wang

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a national correspondent for NPR based in New York City. He reports on the people, power and money behind the 2020 census.

Wang received the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award for covering the Census Bureau and the Trump administration's push for a citizenship question.

His reporting has also earned awards from the Asian American Journalists Association, National Association of Black Journalists, and Native American Journalists Association.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he has reported on race and ethnicity for Code Switch and worked on Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

As a student at Swarthmore College, he worked on a weekly podcast about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Updated at 7:32 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to a speedy review of President Trump's attempt to exclude unauthorized immigrants from the census numbers used to reallocate seats in Congress.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There's not even two full days left to get counted for the 2020 census. The U.S. Supreme Court said yesterday it is going to allow the Trump administration to stop counting early. The Census Bureau says October 15 is the new end date. The administration has been pushing for an early end in order to try to get a specific set of census numbers into President Trump's hands by December 31.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang covers the census and he joins us now. Welcome, Hansi.

HANSI LO WANG, BYLINE: Thank you, Rachel.

Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET

The Trump administration can end counting for the 2020 census early after the Supreme Court approved a request to suspend a lower court order that extended the count's schedule.

The Supreme Court has granted the Trump administration's request to end the 2020 Census count as soon as possible. This comes after an emergency request from the administration.

Updated Saturday at 10:20 a.m. ET

A federal judge has issued an order to clarify that, for now, the U.S. Census Bureau must continue counting for the 2020 census through Oct. 31 after finding the bureau made multiple violations of an earlier order that extends the national head count's schedule.

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