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Thousands of people are losing care due to the state's new auto no-fault law

The scene of a fatal car crash outside Burns, Ore., earlier this month.
The scene of a fatal car crash outside Burns, Ore., earlier this month.

A high profile lay leader in the Episcopal Church says Michigan auto accident survivors with catastrophic injuries need help. Thousands are losing care due to the state's new auto no-fault law.

Bonnie Anderson is a former President of the House of Deputies of the Episcopal Church.

Anderson is organizing leaders of synagogues, mosques, and churches to urge the state Legislature to respond to the crisis.

“I want anyone that has leadership positions in their religious organizations to join together and become a coalition for fixing the no-fault reform and helping people that need the help.”

Anderson says the law should have been fixed by now. The law allows insurance companies to cut payments to caregivers by nearly half. The caregiving industry that cares for auto accident survivors is now collapsing as a result.