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On Sunday, people around the country will mark one year since the Women's March on Washington, D.C. Last year it brought hundreds of thousands of liberals to the capital, many wearing pink knitted caps in solidarity. Others marched in hundreds of cities and towns across the United States and more than 80 other countries.

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Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a deal for you.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DON'T BE CRUEL")

ELVIS PRESLEY: (Singing) You know I can be found...

A favorite pastime for April Gibson and her teenage son, Gregory Bess, is simply talking to one another.

"I think I learn more from those conversations than school," says Gregory, who turned 17 on Thursday.

But during a recent StoryCorps conversation in St. Paul, Minn., April, 33, knew he wanted to talk about a subject the two hadn't really explored.

April invited her son to ask about what that time was like for her, as a young black mother. "Now you can ask me the hard question," April says.

"What did you feel like when I was born?" Gregory asks.

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

Anti-abortion-rights activists who gathered at the National Mall for the 45th annual rally known as the March for Life heard a history-making address from the man who has become an unlikely champion of their cause: President Trump.

A powerful storm that brought hurricane-force winds to parts of Western Europe, causing floods, downing trees and halting public transport, has been blamed for at least nine deaths in four countries.

The Netherlands, Germany, France and Belgium got the brunt of the unusual storm system. Some areas saw winds up to 126 mph.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET Friday

The prime minister of New Zealand, Jacinda Ardern, has announced that she is pregnant with her first child and will take a six-week break from her official duties to give birth.

In what may be a groundbreaking move, Ardern's plan follows what was already shaping up to be a different approach to both political power and motherhood.

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