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Mail carriers react to Postal Service Reform Act

A Chicago man has been charged with mail fraud and mail theft after allegedly changing UPS's corporate mailing address to the address of his own apartment. Here, mail is sorted at Chicago's main post office in 2006.
A Chicago man has been charged with mail fraud and mail theft after allegedly changing UPS's corporate mailing address to the address of his own apartment. Here, mail is sorted at Chicago's main post office in 2006.

Union mail carriers say they are relieved about the passage of the Postal Service Reform Act.

President Joe Biden signed the Act into law on Wednesday. It's intended to make the federal agency more financially stable.

Roscoe Woods is Legislative Director of the Michigan Postal Workers Union. He says the Act could forestall the postal service being privatized.

"My father was pretty much stuck in the house but he was a veteran but he got all his medications, they came right to his mailbox right on time all the time." said Woods. He said a private agency could decide to no longer serve low population rural areas.

Elsbeth Inglis lives in a rural area of Barry County. She hopes the new law shuts down talk of privatizing the Postal Service.

"We have a long driveway off a dirt road, some of those packages were left in the snow and rain before I knew they were there; our postal delivery people always bring things to the door." said Inglis. She said private companies make their own rules and are unreliable where she lives.

The Act requires the Postal Service to deliver mail six days a week. It also allows the service to do things like sell hunting and fishing licenses to generate more revenue.