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Routine testing reveals two cases of bovine tuberculosis in Alcona and Sanilac County deer farms.

A new study suggests that white-tailed deer, like the one here, could carry the virus SARS-CoV-2 indefinitely and spread it back to humans periodically.
Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images
A new study suggests that white-tailed deer, like the one here, could carry the virus SARS-CoV-2 indefinitely and spread it back to humans periodically.

Officials say they will analyze DNA from the tuberculosis bacteria to determine where it came from. That testing is expected to take three-months.

The last time a deer farm in Michigan reported bovine T-B was in 2009. The disease is found in free-ranging deer every year in Michigan. Bovine TB can affect other mammals, including other livestock and humans.