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25M grant will go to expand public health in Flint

05 February 2019, Lower Saxony, Hannover: Medical students practice in the "Skills Lab" of the Hannover Medical School.
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Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Images

The Michigan State University College of Human Medicine has received the largest grant in its history.

The funding will help MSU expand public health programs in Flint.

The 25-million dollar grant from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation allows the college to hire more faculty, build its research base and create new partnerships with community agencies.

The foundation initially helped the college relocate its public health program to Flint about a decade ago.

Since then, MSU has drawn global acclaim for the work of staff pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, who brought Flint’s childhood lead poisoning crisis to national attention.

MSU is conducting ongoing research to mitigate the effects of COVID-19 through wastewater sampling, and the university is also working to reduce health disparities associated with the disease among African-Americans.

Kevin Lavery has been news director at WKAR since September 2006.