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Representative Debbie Dingell looks back on the January 6th insurrection

The January 6 attack on the Capitol raised alarm bells for a think tank studying democracy.
Samuel Corum
/
Getty Images
The January 6 attack on the Capitol raised alarm bells for a think tank studying democracy.

The insurrection at the US Capitol last year served as a stark reminder of how fragile democracies can be.

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell says she was frightened by the violent actions of Donald Trump supporters that day, but she’s also been disturbed by what’s happened since. “What is also as frightening to me is the fact that we have people across the country trying to undermine people's confidence in the outcomes of their elections,” she says.

Using unfounded allegations of voter fraud, Republican-led state legislatures across the country have enacted dozens of new laws to limit voter participation.

Dingell – a Democrat - again urged her colleagues across the aisle to support nationwide election standards and an expansion of voting rights.

GOP Senators have almost uniformly come out against the John Lewis Voting Rights Act – denying a vote on the bill.

Russ McNamara is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for 101.9 WDET, presenting local news to the station’s loyal listeners. McNamara has been working in radio since he was 17 - and in news since 2012. He also worked as play-by-play announcer for Wayne State University basketball for seven years. Born in the Upper Peninsula, McNamara is a lifelong Michigander. He is a 2002 graduate of Central Michigan University’s Broadcast and Cinematic Arts Program.