Music and NPR News for Central and Northern Michigan
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Ranked Choice Supporters Weigh Options After Lansing City Council Pulls Ballot Measure

A sample ballot is shown via the Dominion Voting Systems that Georgians use to vote.
John Bazemore
/
AP
A sample ballot is shown via the Dominion Voting Systems that Georgians use to vote.

The Lansing City Council is reversing course and won’t ask voters to decide on ranked-choice voting in November. Now, supporters of the alternate election method are evaluating their next steps.

Council members agreed last month (July) to ask voters whether they want to switch local elections to ranked-choice voting. That’s a system where voters rank candidates in order of preference.

But council members undid that decision after Michigan’s elections director told them ranked choice voting is not legal under state law.

Jim DeLine is treasurer of the advocacy group Rank MI Vote. He argues ranked-choice voting is legal in Michigan and says he is not deterred by the City Council’s decision.

“I think the word more is ‘disappointed.’”

Rank MI Vote could start gathering signatures to bring ranked-choice voting to Lansing’s ballot without the council’s approval. The group filed paperwork in July, indicating it plans to raise money to back ranked-choice proposals across the state.

Related Content