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Health, Science and Environment

DNR launches study of deer migration patterns in Upper Peninsula

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Xavier Robin
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The Michigan DNR is conducting a four year, 600-thousand dollar study of the migratory patterns of deer in western upper peninsula.

State officials say the study will eventually be extended across the upper peninsula and will provide information important to stopping the spread of chronic wasting disease.

CWD has already been found in the lower peninsula and has been confirmed 30 miles away from the Michigan border in Wisconsin.

John Pepin is with the DNR.

“So what this study is going to do is get a scientific based understanding of deer movements. There seasonal home ranges, migration, and then also estimate on population abundance.”

Pepin said in the first week of the study, the DNR has already put trackers on fifty deer.

“The first couple of days out were very successful from my understanding. They had a certain quota of deer and they’ve already done that.”

Pepin said an in-depth knowledge of deer migration patterns will help wildlife biologists develop recommendations for stopping the spread of CWD in the Upper Peninsula.

IN THE INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE THE DNR IS A FINANCIAL SUPPORTER OF WCMU