Music

This week on Destination Out, Mike Johnston featured flutist Nicole Mitchell, who is a member of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians out of Chicago. Her new album is “Mandorla Awakening II: Emerging Worlds” on the FPE label. We also heard tracks from her band “Indigo Trio,” and works from saxophonist David Boykin. And we featured three versions of Charlie Parker’s “Steeplechase,” including recorded versions by Bird, Jackie McLean, and Dexter Gordon.  

This week on Homespun, Tom Ball is spinning some classic sides from the Osborne Bros., Larry Sparks, and some early blues for Big Bill Broonzy and Petie Wheatstraw.

Flickr User filipe ferreira https://flic.kr/p/4tEZV

This week's show features Alice Coltrane including her work with late husband, John Coltrane.  Artists like Gene Ammons and Sonny Stitt also featured.

Sylvia Moy was one of the first female producers at Detroit's legendary Motown Records, co-writing hits for artists like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye and The Isley Brothers. Moy died on Saturday at age 78 in Dearborn, Michigan from complications of pneumonia.

Moy started at Motown not long after a young phenomenon named Little Stevie Wonder hit No. 1 on the Billboard chart. But after he hit puberty, Wonder struggled to stay in the spotlight. It was Moy who reportedly convinced Motown executive Berry Gordy to keep the teenager on contract.

One hundred years ago Tuesday, in a working-poor neighborhood of Newport News, Va., a laundress and a shipyard worker had a baby girl. The father soon disappeared, and the mother and child moved north to New York. The mother died. The girl ran away and became one of the most important singers of the 20th century.

Ella Fitzgerald could sing anything: a silly novelty song, like her breakthrough hit, "A-Tisket, A-Tasket." A samba that scatted. A ballad, spooling out like satin.

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