Education

More than 2 million Black men who pursued a higher education never finished their degree, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The reasons range from college affordability to family responsibilities to military service.

Morehouse College wants to help them reach the finish line.

Starting this August, the historically Black men's college in Atlanta is offering an online program with reduced tuition for men who already have some college credits.

Over 2 million Black men in the U.S. have started — but never completed — college degrees. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with David A. Thomas, president of Morehouse College, about their program to help.

When you think of the history of Black education in the United States, you might think of Brown vs. Board of Education and the fight to integrate public schools. But there's a parallel history too, of Black people pooling their resources to educate and empower themselves independently.

Enslaved people learned to read and write whenever and wherever they could, often in secret and against the law. "In accomplishing
this, I was compelled
 to resort to
various
 stratagems," like convincing white children to help him, wrote Frederick Douglass. "I had
no regular 
teacher."

A year ago, the kindergartners learning English in Tanya Gan Lim's class were thriving. Back then, she'd bring in props and pictures to help her students learn the language and sound out words. Then she'd lavish them with praise, even if they stumbled, to build their confidence.

A CDC report finds teachers may be bigger spreaders of COVID-19 in schools than students. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Grant Rivera, superintendent of the Georgia district involved in the case study.

Pages