Arts and Culture

Ally Schmaling wants a "complete annihilation of gender."

The Boston-based queer and gender nonbinary photographer created a portrait series exploring queer and nonbinary identities — people living without limits and refusing to identify with traditional male and female gender labels.

"It's our job to push institutions forward and create art that reflects the world we want to see," Schmaling says.

"Sometimes, I feel I got to get away," sang the Who in their 1965 single "The Kids Are Alright," and no wonder the song became an instant classic for the youth of Townshend and Daltrey's g-g-g-generation — teenagers of every age tend toward the restive, longing to experience life beyond whichever town or city they were raised in.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Saida Dahir from Salt Lake City is a student activist who uses spoken word to explore her place in America and the world. On the eve of her high school graduation, she recorded this poem.

(SOUNDBITE OF POEM, "THE WALKING STEREOTYPE")

At one point in his hilariously searing novel Black Card, Chris L. Terry pauses the narrative to issue a list of what makes certain people racist.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Pages