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Dennis Johnson fell victim last week to a new form of harassment known as "Zoombombing," in which intruders hijack video calls and post hate speech and offensive images such as pornography. It's a phenomenon so alarming that the FBI has issued a warning about using Zoom.

Like many people these days, Johnson is doing a lot of things over the Internet that he would normally do in person. Last week, he defended his doctoral dissertation in a Zoom videoconference.

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Until the crisis, June Freeman was doing a vital job. She provided home health care in San Diego. Six days a week, she visited a man with dementia.

JUNE FREEMAN: So I walk him in the park, feed him, doing puzzle with him.

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Are enough Americans following national guidelines to reduce the spread of the coronavirus?

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Well, Deborah Birx, a key member of the White House pandemic task force, says no.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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