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No-fault fix advocates meet with lawmakers as breaking point nears

Every car in Michigan that was covered by insurance as of the end of October will bring its owner $400, under a new refund plan approved by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's administration.
Carlos Osorio
/
AP
Every car in Michigan that was covered by insurance as of the end of October will bring its owner $400, under a new refund plan approved by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's administration.

Advocates for people severely injured in auto accidents pled with state lawmakers on Wednesday to make changes to Michigan's 2019 no-fault insurance reform.

Severely injured car crash survivors like former Detroit Redwing Vladimir Konstantinov say they’ll lose at-home care soon if lawmakers don't act.

Theresa Ruedisueli appeared with Konstantinov’s care team at the meeting. She says there’s support for raising home-care reimbursement rates from both Democrats and Republicans.

“We’re just asking for consideration to fix the fee structure and establish a rate moving forward that is amenable to both parties.”

Ruedisueli and other care providers say the 2019 reform allows auto insurers to pay them less than the cost of medical treatment.

Bills to address that have stalled for months in the state Legislature.