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Northern Michigan celebrates Passover

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Millions of Americans are concluding their Easter travel plans. But Christians aren’t the only religious group with a major holiday this weekend. Tonight marks the start of the Jewish holiday of Passover. We asked Petoskey worshippers how they plan to observe the week-long celebration.

 

 

Passover commemorates the Biblical story of the Jewish exodus from Egypt to the Promised Land. Families usually celebrate the first two nights with a seder - a retelling of the Jewish liberation from Egypt. A seder is typically served with traditional Jewish food such as matzah, brisket, and fish.

Valerie Meyerson is the Vice-President of Temple B’nai Israel of Petoskey. She said Passover is an opportunity for northern Michigan’s small Jewish community to come together.

“The Jewish community is very strong. And I think part of that is because we are a minority, and we’re an all-volunteer congregation...So everybody pitches in. We all know each other, we all get along, we all like each other. We celebrate together. They’re kind of our greater family - it’s the mishpacha of northern Michigan.”

Meyerson said even though their congregation is smaller than those in metro-Detroit or other large cities, it still holds monthly services and gathers for each holiday.