Education

Brian Butcher, a history teacher at Ballou High School, sat in the bleachers of the school's brand-new football field last June watching 164 seniors receive diplomas. It was a clear, warm night and he was surrounded by screaming family and friends snapping photos and cheering.

This week, two different people showed up for the same job as the acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Mick Mulvaney is President Trump's pick and also his current budget director. Outgoing director Richard Cordray, an Obama appointee, named his deputy Leandra English for the role.

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Erin Roth faced a tough choice in 2015. She needed to select a school for her daughter. And in Washington, D.C., where she lives, she faced a dizzying array of traditional and charter schools from which to choose.

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This is the first story in an NPR series, "Take a Number," that will explore problems around the world and the people who are trying to solve them.

Elisheva Adler was 20 years old, sitting in pajamas in her childhood bedroom in Long Island, the first time she saved someone's life via text message.

The Department of Justice has opened a probe into the role of race in Harvard University's admissions policies and is threatening to sue unless Harvard turns over documents by a Dec. 1 deadline, according to correspondence obtained by NPR.

It's the time of year when kids are thinking about their holiday wish lists. So what's a parent to do when a child, possibly a very young child, asks for a smartphone?

We hear that smartphones can be addictive, that screen time can hurt learning, but can't these minicomputers also teach kids about responsibility and put educational apps at their tiny fingertips?

Yerianne Roldán wants to be a graphic designer, or maybe a writer, or maybe both. Her good friend and classmate, Zuleyka Avila, has already made up her mind. She's going to be a pediatrician.

Those plans hit a bump in the road this fall, though, when Hurricane Maria tore through Puerto Rico, where both girls lived with their families. Forced to leave the island — much of which is still without power — they've both relocated to Orlando.

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