Education

In the video posted to Twitter, Ayrton Little dons Harvard red, the viewer watching him as he peers at his own screen, waiting to see whether he got into his dream school. Everyone seems to sweat. Little's schoolmates crowd around him in anticipation. A big moment to be sure, especially for a 16-year-old. Then a gasp and the room erupts in cheers, screams and embraces.

He did it.

It seemed like a moment when everything would change. Twenty children and six adults were shot and killed by a gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

There was sadness. There was anger. There were questions. How could this happen, and what would be done to stop anything like it from ever happening again?

With wildfires still raging across parts of Southern California, dozens of schools have been closed. Many will stay that way till the new year. That gives educators valuable time to think about what they can do, when school resumes, to help students who have been traumatized by these fires.

Schools across the country are nervously watching to see if the Federal Communications Commission chooses to repeal Obama-era regulations that protect an open internet, often referred to as "net neutrality."

The 2015 rules are meant to prevent internet providers, such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon, from controlling what people can watch and see on the internet. Companies can't block access to any websites or apps, and can't meddle with loading speeds.

The chief executives of 59 private colleges and seven public universities took home more than $1 million in total compensation in 2015, according to an analysis released this week by The Chronicle of Higher Education.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

$12-million to go to high school CTE programs

Dec 12, 2017
Flickr User: Matt Harasymczuk / https://flic.kr/p/TNFrFZ

State officials are looking to address a skilled worker shortage in Michigan.

 

The Michigan Department of Education is investing $12-million dollars into career technical education programs for high schoolers.

 

 

 


France's education chief says that when students go back to school next fall, all mobile phone use will be banned in schools for students roughly 15 and younger.

In 2001, not long after Oklahoma had adopted one of the nation's first universal pre-K programs, researchers from Georgetown University began tracking kids who came out of the program in Tulsa, documenting their academic progress over time.

In a new report published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management today, researchers were able to show that Tulsa's pre-K program has significant, positive effects on students' outcomes and well-being through middle school.

It takes courage to confront a bully, to talk openly about the pain they can inflict. Maybe that's why star athletes, celebrities and thousands of other people are embracing Keaton Jones, a student in Tennessee who talks about bullies that persecute him at school, in a video that went viral over the weekend.

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