Education

Gaspar Vila Mayans elementary school, in a low-income area in Puerto Rico's capital of San Juan, was one of the lucky ones.

Most of the building escaped damage, and the school was able to reopen just two weeks after Hurricane Maria hit in late September.

Once it was back up and running, the school quickly became a lifeline for the community, providing meals, activities and a sense of normalcy to families and their children.

Now, it's facing the possibility of closure for an entirely different reason – there aren't enough students to fill up its classrooms.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

Trying to change Obama-era rules, the Trump administration is one step closer to making it more difficult for students to have loan debt wiped clean in cases involving fraud by universities.

After another round of holidays, it's safe to assume, a lot of children have been diving into media more than usual. They may have received new electronic toys and gadgets or downloaded new apps and games. Managing all that bleeping and buzzing activity causes anxiety in many parents. Here's a roundup of some of the latest research, combined with some of our previous reporting, to help guide your decision-making around family screen use.

1. Globally, tech brings young people opportunity as well as risk

Rated PG: Profoundly Gifted

Jan 2, 2018

Stories about geniuses seem to fascinate us. From “Rain Man” and “Temple Grandin” to “House” and “S-town,” people with extraordinarily high intelligence make for great characters.

But what is life really like if you’re profoundly gifted, with an IQ of at least 160? And what’s it like living among the rest of us?

In the first installment of our series of audience-requested discussions, we examine what it means to be profoundly gifted.

GUESTS

On the NPR Ed Team, I am what you might call the grizzled veteran. I've seen education trends come and go and come again. And go again.

You get the idea.

In years past, around December, my teammates would often pause by my desk and ask: "What do you think we'll be covering next year?"

I've always found this a fun thought exercise, and, at some point, my editor suggested I jot down my answers and share them beyond our cubicles. And so, here are a few predictions for 2018.

Flickr user Adirondack Watershed Institute Follow / https://flic.kr/p/Uvvrdi

The new year will bring a new program to Michigan on the state’s many lakes. It’s titled the ‘Introduction to Lakes Education Course’ and it’s aimed at helping Michigan natives and transplants learn more about one of the state’s most distinctive features.


Flickr User Susan Ruggles / https://flic.kr/p/pufkYh

CMU has been working on a series of forums for the spring in an effort to make students more politically and socially aware. One of the discussions will focus on midterm elections.

The 10 Most Popular 'Fresh Air' Interviews Of 2017

Dec 29, 2017

In 2017, Fresh Air marked 30 years as a nationally syndicated, daily radio program by doing what it does best: more in-depth interviews.

Reporters and researchers are just starting to comb through the huge, rushed-to-passage tax package to figure out the implications.

One of the changes, according to the Institute on Taxation & Economic Policy, which advocates for a "fair and sustainable" tax system, allows far more wealthy donors in 10 states to turn a profit through "donations" to private school scholarships.

The NPR series, "Take A Number," is exploring problems around the world — and the people who are trying to solve them — each through the lens of a single number.

Thirty-six percent.

That was the high school graduation rate for youth in foster care in Seattle and King County, Washington, in 2010.

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