Arts and Culture

The 71st annual Tony Awards, which recognizes achievements in Broadway productions, will be held Sunday at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. Topping the list of nominees this year, with 12 nods, is the hit musical Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812. It's somewhat based on Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace and has been lauded by critics for its diverse casting, wildly innovative set and fresh take on a classic story.

Updated at 1:04 p.m. ET

Adam West, the actor behind one of the most beloved and enduring renditions of Batman, died Friday night at age 88. West donned the black mask of the Caped Crusader in the 1960s, playing the role as a plucky, intrepid hero for television.

Relationship expert Esther Perel is the author of Mating in Captivity, and her new podcast Where Should We Begin, features real people talking about real problems.

Since Perel is an expert on couples and relationships, we've invited her to play a game called "No sex for you!" Three questions about monks and monasteries.

Beach Reads You Need: Four Sandy Summer Romances

19 hours ago

Summer is a time for unabashedly delighting in beach reads. Yes, they're engaging, yes, they go down easy — but regular readers of escapist fiction know they'll find powerful, universal themes and truths tucked within these tasty pages. Here are four books that provide an absorbing escape — they all make for excellent poolside reading — while also meditating on the power of love, duty and family.

Maya Rodale is a bestselling romance author.

The best kind of nature writing celebrates not the placidly, distantly picturesque — mountaintops and sunsets — but the near, dank, and teeming. The Essex Serpent, Sarah Perry's gloriously alive historical novel, squirms with bugs, moss and marsh.

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There's a classic moment in the romantic thriller Charade, when Audrey Hepburn says to Cary Grant in exasperation, "Do you know what's the matter with you? ... Nothing."

For decades, the whole world felt the same. Grant's unrivaled blend of charm, good looks and silliness — he hadn't a shred of pomposity or elitism — made him a movie star everyone loved. Everyone, that is, except Archie Leach, the actor's real-life self who wrote that he'd spent years cautiously peering from behind the face of a man known as Cary Grant.

This week's show combines two segments from our fall tour that we haven't had a chance to share yet, because we've been so busy dealing with new things from week to week. First, from our Seattle show with Audie Cornish, we talk about when you hang in with culture until the very end and when you quit — or, as you might say, throw a book across the room. (Glen has strong feelings about this.) Shonda Rhimes, how to watch Law & Order, and lots more will go by the window as you travel through this segment.

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