The Takeaway

Weekdays at Noon

The Takeaway is an hour-long national news program that relies on correspondents, guests and listeners from across the country to provide perspectives and analysis to understand the day's news. Every day, The Takeaway convenes a diverse group of voices, and including newsmakers and reporters from around the globe, to create a national conversation each day at noon.

Ways to Connect

Roland Williams isn’t like other 11-year-old boys. He has stage 4 lung cancer, and he is bedridden most days. 

“My son doesn’t get to do anything,” says his mother, Myra Gregory. “He’s at home in bed in pain right now.”

Gregory and Roland live in St. Louis, Missouri. Roland and his two brothers rely on the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, for access to medical care. Nearly 9 million children across America depend on CHIP for everything from annual checkups and vaccinations to treatment for serious illnesses.

On Friday, Dec. 1, New York Magazine reported that several women — including former producers, co-hosts and interns — say they experienced sexual harassment, sexual assault and bullying by former Takeaway host John Hockenberry.

The Takeaway is a co-production of WNYC and PRI, which owns this website.

It seems that every morning the world waits for a new tweet notification from the president of the United States, but is it always Donald Trump hitting the send button?

Early Wednesday morning, President Donald Trump retweeted three videos from a Twitter account linked to the extreme right-wing group Britain First.

Are you under 35? You are the future of the Democratic Party.

That’s according to Howard Dean, the former chairman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) from 2005 to 2009, a six-term governor of Vermont and a former presidential candidate.

How gun laws let domestic violence offenders slip through the cracks

Nov 17, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mujitra/">MIKI Yosihito</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY&nbsp;2.0</a> (cropped)

Many mass shooters share a disturbing commonality: domestic abuse.

It can be seen in the case of Kevin Jansen Neal, who went on a shooting rampage in California this week. He killed four people and injured several more before he was fatally shot by police. Authorities later found the body of a fifth victim, his wife, at the couple’s home.

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

“Oh, what a jerk, just ignore him.”

That was the advice a colleague gave to Alexandria Chang about 13 years ago. At the time, Chang was in her mid-20s and was a preschool teacher at a private school outside of Boston. She says that a father of one of the children in the school had made a sexually explicit remark to her.

How a rapper's radio interview revealed a Saudi soft power campaign

Nov 1, 2017

Is a foreign government funding that interview you’re reading or the podcast you’re listening to?

In early August, The Takeaway received an email with the subject line: “Feature Idea: The Middle East’s #1 Hip-Hop Artist Tours U.S.”

Who is George Papadopoulos?

Oct 31, 2017

Monday’s 12-count indictment against former Trump aides Paul Manafort and Rick Gates includes a slew of charges, from money laundering to failing to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts to conspiracy against the United States.   

Diversity and equality remain elusive in ballet

Oct 30, 2017
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Mohd Rasfan/Reuters

Choreographer Benjamin Millepied likes to push the bounds of ballet.

In a recent piece he created for the American Ballet Theatre, dancers appear in the lobby during intermission, swirling through the space usually reserved for audience members waiting for the next act.

"It does change this idea of ballet as behind this red curtain,” says Millepied. The French-born dancer-turned-choreographer has been on a mission to make ballet relevant — to bring it out from behind that red curtain — for years.

The curious case of the $629 ER bill — and one expensive Band-Aid

Oct 16, 2017

In January 2015, Malcolm Bird took his 1-year-old daughter, Collette, to an emergency room after she started bleeding heavily from a cut on her finger. The doctor cleaned up the cut, put a Band-Aid on it, and sent them home.

A few weeks later, the family received a bill in the mail for $629. The breakdown of the bill was $7 for the Band-Aid, and $622 for what's known as an "emergency room facility fee” — the price a hospital charges for seeking services from an emergency room, no matter what problem a patient is having.

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