The Splendid Table

Sundays at Noon

The Splendid Table has been at the forefront of food issues and policies since its inception. Long before eating local became a catchphrase and farmers' markets became ubiquitous, The Splendid Table was talking about the changes needed in the food system and what was happening on the grassroots level. In fact, when The Splendid Table first went on the air, founding host Lynne Rossetto Kasper had to make sure to define such terms as "organic" and "sustainable" for listeners. Today those terms have become part of the everyday lexicon, and people's hunger for wholesome food and the rituals surrounding it has only increased.

In 2017, The Splendid Table will begin an exciting new chapter. After hosting for 21 seasons, Lynne will retire at the end of the year, with award-winning New York Times Magazine columnist and Top Chef Masters judge Francis Lam becoming the new host. Francis has been a frequent contributor and guest host (and fan favorite) on the program since 2010. Lynne will continue to contribute to the program until she fully retires at the end of 2017.

From its first mealtime brainstorm to the award-winning weekly program it is today, The Splendid Table continues its celebration of food and the roles it plays in our lives.

Taking the long cut with Anya Fernald

Aug 18, 2016
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Brown W. Cannon III © 2016

Home Cooked: Essential Recipes for a New Way to Cook author Anya Fernald tells Russ Parsons how she got her unconventional start, her enthusiasm for "long cuts," and what you can do to take the stress out of hosting a dinner party.

Russ Parsons: You came to your approach to food in kind of an unusual way, instead of working at restaurants or going to cooking school, the way so many people do now. How did you learn how to cook?

The art of the spoon

Aug 18, 2016
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Jen Russell

Artist Kiko Denzer teaches Lynne Rossetto Kasper about the craft of spoon-carving.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: From the bread ovens to spoons, how did this all evolve?

Kiko Denzer: The short answer is they're both sculpture, and they both feed the sculpture passion, and they both feed people, and I think that, really, is the connection.

The fragile science of ice cream

Aug 18, 2016
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Copyright 2016 America's Test Kitchen

Making ice cream and frozen yogurt requires skill, so much so that Penn State offers a course on the subject. Molly Birnbaum, executive editor of Cook's Science for America's Test Kitchen, attended, and shares what she learned with Sally Swift.

[More from Birnbaum]

Sally Swift: It is the time of year for homemade ice cream and I bet you have some ideas for us.

Molly Birnbaum

Zhug and how to make it

Aug 17, 2016
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J. Kenzi Lopez-Alt for Serious Eats

Some are calling zhug the new Sriracha, but what is it? Serious Eats' J. Kenzi Lopez-Alt answers that question for Lynne Rossetto Kasper, and advises you to get out your mortar and pestle.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: Tell me about this sauce.

J. Kenzi Lopez-Alt (Photo: Vicky Wasik for Serious Eats)

The Wisconsin supper club is something so unique to its region of the U.S. that someone really needed to make a movie about it. Holly De Ruyter has done just that with her documentary, "Old Fashioned." She tells Shauna Sever about the history of this Badger State institution, the importance of the bar, and what you'll find on a relish tray.

Sabrina Ghayour's simple shortcuts

Aug 4, 2016

Sabrina Ghayour cooks up simple, Middle Eastern-influenced dishes with a modern twist in her second cookbook, Sirocco. She tells Russ Parsons about the shortcuts she's found to traditional Persian methods (despite some skeptical aunts) and the spices she relies on in her kitchen.