Travis Sleight

Student Reporter

Travis Sleight is a student reporter for WCMU, joining our staff in early 2017. You can hear him report daily for 'Morning Edition' and 'All Things Considered.'

Flickr user Mark Mathosian / https://flic.kr/p/GTcfoz

Excitement continues to rise for the eclipse on Monday and safety is always a concern. But is looking at an eclipse as dangerous as it’s often made out to be?

 

Flickr user Kevin Simmons / https://flic.kr/p/RVnLXM

State officials are working to increase access to mental health care. The Michigan House Mental Health task force will meet in Clare County later this month to discuss mental health issues.


Flickr user DRs Kulturarvsprojekt / https://flic.kr/p/aUg4ER

Michigan has a new tool in effort to raise awareness of human trafficking. A new video teaches healthcare professionals the signs when a person may be a trafficking victim.

Flickr user litlnemo / https://flic.kr/p/5nLh63

While watching the eclipse Monday, the sky has other gems to watch for too. The planet Venus shows itself in broad daylight during the full eclipse. The ancient Greeks believed Venus was the goddess of love and beauty and times when she showed herself were to be held in admiration.

Flickr user Takeshi Kuboki / https://flic.kr/p/c2xJwE

Looking ahead at the extended forecast for next week’s eclipse Michigan residents may feel uneasy.

Matt Gillen is a meteorologist for the National Weather Center in Gaylord. He said with rain currently in the west, there is potential for clouds Monday in Michigan.

“The potential is there for some cloud cover to interrupt the viewing. But as we get closer to the twenty first we’ll have a much better idea at the exact cloud cover for northern Michigan”.

Flickr user Don Sniegowski / https://flic.kr/p/T9AMFs

State officials are bring attention to what they’re calling the scam of the month. They said they’ve seen many people trying to pay state debts using federal treasury accounts.

Treasury officials said groups have been holding seminars throughout the country teaching attendees to use federal treasury routing numbers, and their social security number as the account number to pay their outstanding state debts.

Ron Leix is a spokesperson for the Michigan Department of Treasury.

Flickr user jason jenkins / https://flic.kr/p/dBoANf

The next major opportunity to “wish upon a shooting star”  comes Friday and Saturday night during the Perseid meteor shower.

 

Mary Adams is the director of the Headlands International Dark Sky Park in Emmet County. She said the best time and place for viewing is in a wide open space preferably away from city lights between midnight and dawn.

Flickr user Erik Levin / https://flic.kr/p/ofjycj

A new app has been launched by the state for people to report fish and wildlife observations. It's called ‘Eyes in the Field’.

The new website replaces 15 reporting sites previously used by the state.

Tom Weston is the Chief technology officer for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. He says now, whether you’re reporting sightings of a rattlesnake, or wild turkeys, or reporting a diseased deer,  it can all be done on the same site.

Flickr user Ilja Klutman / https://flic.kr/p/2grAE

Protecting lakes and stream is a priority for environmental officials in Michigan. This year they’ve awarded more than four million dollars in grant funding to do just that.

Bob Sweet is an aquatic biologist for the Department of Environmental Quality. He says there are several ways organizations are working to improve water quality.

Lori Harneb Zenas

Survey crews from the National Weather Service were assessing damage today following a tornado yesterday in Antrim County.

Keith Berger is a Meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Gaylord. He said crews classified the tornado as an EF zero. The scale to measure a tornado is zero to five, where a zero is the least powerful.

Pages