Steve Carmody

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?

My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.

 

How did you get involved in radio?

I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  

 

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?

I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)

 

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?

Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.

 

What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?

Zilch. I don’t listen to music.

 

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?

This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.

 

What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?

I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.

 

What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?

The ability to cook.

 

What do you like best about working in public radio?

I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.

 

If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?

No one really.

 

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?

The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.

 

What would your perfect meal consist of?

A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.

 

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?

The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.

 

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?

That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).

 

What else would you like people to know about you?

I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Flickr User U.S. Department of Agriculture / https://flic.kr/p/27zR6Bf

The nation’s mayors want Washington to spend more to fix problems with water infrastructure in America’s cities.

Flickr User: Christopher Webb / https://flic.kr/p/3LGNp

At a conference in Flint today officials and national experts are discussing how to reduce childhood exposures to health hazards found in school environments and restoring confidence in school drinking water systems.

Claire Barnett is the executive director of the Healthy Schools Network, a New York based group that promotes healthy environments in schools.

Problems range from lead in school drinking fountains to crumbling buildings are getting worse nationally.

Flickr Users: Adriane and Christopher Lau / https://flic.kr/p/7msZZW

In the middle of a tight re-election campaign, Michigan Congressman Mike Bishop took time today to escort a top Trump administration official around a Lansing development project.

flickr user: Maureen / https://flic.kr/p/faksxt

Several environmental groups are stepping up their efforts against an expected plan to build a tunnel for an oil pipeline that passes through the Mackinac Straits.


flickr user: conor lawless / https://flic.kr/p/LKDbaA

Legalizing recreational marijuana would net half a billion dollars in new state tax revenue over its first five years. That's according to a new study.


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