Rhitu Chatterjee

Rhitu Chatterjee is a reporter and editor on NPR's Science Desk, where she reports the latest news and feature stories on science, health, and the environment. She also generates ideas for series or themes for the desk to explore, and periodically edits the science team on both radio and digital platforms.

In her role, Chatterjee has reported on the reasons behind a disturbing health statistic in America — the unusually high rate of infant death among African Americans. In her previous role as an editor for NPR's The Salt, she produced one of her favorite projects, a short online food video series called "Hot Pot: A Dish. A Memory," which featured dishes from a particular country as made by a person who grew up with the dish. The series was produced in collaboration with NPR's Goats & Soda blog.

Before coming to NPR, Chatterjee reported on current affairs from New Delhi for PRI's The World, and covered science and health news for Science Magazine. Before that, she was based in Boston as a science correspondent with PRI's The World. She has also worked as a freelancer and correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. She began her career covering environmental news and policy for Environmental Science & Technology.

Throughout her career, Chatterjee has reported on everything from basic scientific discoveries to issues at the intersection of science, society and culture. She has covered the legacy of the Bhopal gas tragedy in 1984, the world's largest industrial disaster. She has reported on a mysterious epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka and India. While in New Delhi, she also covered women's issues. Her reporting went beyond the breaking news headlines about sexual violence to document the underlying social pressures faced by Indian girls and women. She has done numerous stories on how a growing number of Indian women are fighting for better opportunities in education and in the workplace and trying to make the country a safer place for future generations of women.

She has won two reporting grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and was awarded a certificate of merit by the Gabriel Awards in 2014.

Chatterjee has mentored student fellows by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, as well as young journalists for the Society of Environmental Journalists' mentorship program. She's also taught science writing at the Santa Fe Science Writing Workshop.

She did her undergraduate work in Darjeeling, India. And she has two master's degrees—a master of science in biotechnology from Visva-Bharati in India, and a master of arts in journalism from the University of Missouri.

Paige Thesing has struggled with insomnia since high school. "It takes me a really long time to fall asleep — about four hours," she says. For years, her mornings were groggy and involved a "lot of coffee."

After a year of trying sleep medication prescribed by her doctor, she turned to the internet for alternate solutions. About four months ago, she settled on a mobile phone meditation app called INSCAPE.

In Thursday's testimony at Judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings, Christine Blasey Ford alleged Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a party in 1982, when she was 15 years old and he was 17.

Kavanaugh staunchly denied these allegations.

But memory is fallible. A question on many people's minds is, how well can anyone recall something that happened over 35 years ago?

Pretty well, say scientists, if the memory is of a traumatic event. That's because of the key role emotions play in making and storing memories.

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