Maggie Penman

Maggie Penman is a reporter and producer for NPR. She got her start in public radio as an intern at WNYC, and has since worked on NPR's flagship show Morning Edition, reported on breaking news for the network, and helped launch the popular social science podcast Hidden Brain.

Her reporting has taken her from the North Dakota Prairie to Berlin, Germany, to a tiny town in Japan called Obama. In 2017, she reported on the German election as an Arthur F. Burns Fellow through the International Center for Journalists.

Protests in Chicago escalated on Saturday night, becoming a tense clash between demonstrators and police over the fatal shooting of a man on the city's South Side.

The Chicago Tribune described a chaotic scene:

Novak Djokovic won the Wimbledon men's singles title for the fourth time on Sunday, defeating South African's Kevin Anderson.

It wasn't a short championship for either competitor – on Friday in the semi-finals Kevin Anderson and John Isner played a remarkable six and a half hour match. That marathon match, in turn, forced Djokovic to play Rafael Nadal over the course of two days, and delayed the women's finals.

The photographs are stunning: a giant mountain of ice towers over a tiny village, with colorful homes reminiscent of little doll houses against the stark, blue-gray landscape.

But for the people living in those houses – that beauty could be life-threatening.

"It's kind of like, if you lived in the suburbs, and you woke up one morning and looked out, and there was a skyscraper next to your house," says David Holland, an oceanographer at New York University who does research in Greenland during the summer months. "I'd be the first to get out of there."

Angelique Kerber has won the Wimbledon women's singles title, beating Serena Williams 6-3, 6-3 in the final. She is the first German to win a Wimbledon singles title since Steffi Graf did so in 1996.

"This is one of the best moments of my career," Kerber told ESPN, saying that it has been her dream since childhood to win Wimbledon. She added that playing against Williams made the moment all the more significant: "Playing against Serena is always an honor for me."

Watch Your Mouth

Jul 12, 2018

If you're bilingual or multilingual, you may have noticed that the different languages you speak will make you stretch in different ways.

Languages like Spanish or French require you to remember the gender assigned to every noun, even inanimate objects. Uttering a sentence as simple as "I read the book" in Russian requires you to indicate whether you finished the book or merely read a few pages. If you're toggling between English and a language like Arabic, you have to swap which side of the page you look at first.

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