Cheyna Roth

Reporter

Cheyna Roth is a reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network, based at the state capitol in Lansing. Her reports are heard daily on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County. Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism. She got her masters at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan. Cheyna also focuses on the legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Flickr User Detroit Regional Chamber / https://flic.kr/p/c7QALA

The Legislature has sent Governor Rick Snyder a set of local retirement bills that passed by wide margins once they were stripped of controversial provisions.


Flickr User Bill Jacobus / https://flic.kr/p/bPQdw

Democratic lawmakers are trying once again to repeal the state’s so-called “Right to Work” law.


Flickr User Doug Kerr / https://flic.kr/p/f8UhJY

The state’s pipeline safety board wants a controversial line temporarily shut down.

Flickr User Pete / https://flic.kr/p/hjWuGP

Michigan’s special education students need more resources. That’s according to a new report released Wednesday.


Flickr User Bob Doran / https://flic.kr/p/HdzLE

Michigan is one big step closer to voting on marijuana legalization.


Flickr User MarihuanayMedicina / https://flic.kr/p/fs8Kwo

Michigan is about to be one step closer to voting on marijuana legalization in 20-18.


Flickr User Neeta Lind / https://flic.kr/p/64VQXv

The state announced the price tag Friday for applications to grow, sell or transport medical marijuana. The application fee will be 6-thousand dollars. It’s a one-time, non-refundable fee. That’s on top of up to 5-thousand dollars that municipalities can charge for an application.

flickr user: slgckgc / https://flic.kr/p/EiZRo5

A teen was recently attacked in Muskegon County. Officials say it’s because he’s gay. Now prosecutors and lawmakers are calling on the legislature to expand the state’s hate crimes law.


Flickr User Global Panorama / https://flic.kr/p/oEx7uD

Michigan residents who want to get into the medical marijuana business had their last shot at a training session Wednesday.


flickr user: F Delventhal / https://flic.kr/p/5gLuq4

The State’s Board of Education can’t decide what to do about recent gun legislation.


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