Cheyna Roth

Reporter

Cheyna Roth is a reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network, based at the state capitol in Lansing. Her reports are heard daily on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County. Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism. She got her masters at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan. Cheyna also focuses on the legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Flickr User Upapa4me / https://flic.kr/p/r3XgDa

Lawmakers continue to focus on bills aimed at sexual assault prevention in response to Larry Nassar. Nassar is the former doctor who told patients he was treating them, when he was actually sexually assaulting them.


flickr user: ruth hartnup / https://flic.kr/p/WHqVJR

Public school teachers marched through downtown Lansing today.


flickr user: david Shane / https://flic.kr/p/9keemc

Michigan could soon require certain people to work for their Medicaid benefits. A bill passed a state Senate panel Wednesday.


Flickr User Chris Potter / https://flic.kr/p/dwSkQ7

The state Legislature moved forward Thursday on a plan to drastically change Michigan’s Medicaid policy.


By Subconsci Productions (https://www.flickr.com/photos/sbconsci/361586876/) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons / https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Doctor%27s_office_equipment.jpg

Some doctors in Michigan are concerned about unintended consequences to their profession if state lawmakers pass some sexual assault bills they’re considering.


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