Politics

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Democrats are hoping that the third time is a charm when it comes to harnessing voter discontent against President Trump.

They're pinning their hopes on political neophyte and singing cowboy Rob Quist as he tries to flip a U.S. House seat held by Republicans in Montana that was vacated by Ryan Zinke, who was confirmed as Secretary of Interior in March.

In the past month, Democratic candidates have come up short in special elections in Republican-dominated districts in Kansas and Georgia (although the Georgia race is headed to a runoff election in June).

Hunger in America can often seem invisible, but recent studies have shown that it is a problem that affects millions of people, many of them children.

Ben Bernanke had to guard his public comments closely in his eight years as the world's most powerful central banker. His words could move global markets.

He hasn't had to be quite as circumspect since leaving the Federal Reserve chairmanship three years ago — and he's kind of enjoying that.

"It's been good! It's nice not to have those responsibilities anymore, and to have more flexibility, more time," he tells NPR.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET Monday

Congressional leaders have struck a deal to keep the federal government funded through September.

The budget negotiations provided Democrats with a rare opportunity for leverage and clout, since Democratic votes will be needed to advance the spending plan through the Senate — and possibly the House if enough members of the conservative Freedom Caucus vote against it.

U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the first Cuban-American elected to Congress and the first congressional Republican to publicly support marriage equality, is retiring next year at the end of her term.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

During a "very friendly" phone conversation, President Donald Trump invited Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte to the White House, signaling a massive shift in attitude from the U.S. toward a leader known best for inciting an extrajudicial war on drugs in his country that's killed more than 7,500 people.

When we got up Sunday, we could hope our long national nightmare is over.

Meaning, of course, that we should finally be free of the obsessive chatter over Donald Trump's first 100 days in office.

After all, who cares about Day 101? Especially when, just last night, we witnessed such a marvelous metaphor for the Trump era, so far.

While official Washington was busy with the White House Correspondents Association's annual dinner – sometimes called "the nerd prom" – Trump was on a different stage in a different city with a very different crowd.

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